Five Questions with… Ania Szado

Szado, Ania (c) Joyce RavidAnia Szado, author of Studio Saint-Ex, answered our five questions.

IFOA: What initially drew you to the story of Little Prince author Antoine de Saint-Exupery?

Szado: I’d always loved The Little Prince. Then I came upon Stacy Schiff’s Saint-Exupéry: A Biography and became completely enamoured of its subject. Saint-Exupéry was charismatic, charming, infuriating and complicated—he was an aviator, inventor, magician and mathematician as well as a great writer. I was amazed to learn that he was living in New York when he wrote The Little Prince.

IFOA: How much time did you spend researching your historical characters and settings—and how did you know when you had the material you needed?

Szado: I spent several years researching Saint-Exupéry—while writing early drafts that had almost no resemblance to what eventually became Studio Saint-Ex. When I finally figured out what I had to write, I wrote and researched simultaneously, letting the demands of the story send me searching for the information and understanding I needed. I found it in numerous Saint-Exupery biographies; his own writings; material on WWII New York, the history of American fashion design, the Garment District, Manhattan’s French expat community, and other topics; and by drawing heavily on the knowledge of an incredibly generous Saint-Exupery scholar in New York, as well as querying Stacy Schiff at a critical juncture.

IFOA: What’s the best book you’ve read lately?

Szado: I picked up Lonesome Dove recently and was quite surprised to find myself loving it. It’s an epic American cowboy story—not something I thought I’d particularly like. But I couldn’t put it down. I didn’t want to stop turning the pages—looking, in particular, for more of Augustus McCrae. I still keep catching myself thinking about the book’s characters and landscapes, and wondering how Larry McMurtry managed to do so much with such barebones material: dust, thirst, desire. Of course, the story is in the desire.

IFOA: What’s one thing you wished you’d known when starting out as a writer?

Szado: I wish I’d realized a long time ago that I need to spend occasional blocks of time writing in complete isolation. As long as I can take a week or a month for myself now and then, thinking only of my story night and day, writing for at least 15 hours daily, I can remain balanced and optimistic in my interactions with the world.

IFOA: Finish this sentence: It really doesn’t matter if…

Szado: It really doesn’t matter if I write a paragraph, a page, or a chapter—just the act of having written makes me feel complete.

Szado will read at Authors at Harbourfront Centre on May 1.

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