Five questions with… Liam Card

Author and screenwriter Liam Card will share Exit Papers from Paradise at IFOA.

IFOA: What are you reading right now?

Card: I just finished Kurt Vonnegut’s Bluebeard. The novel was exceptional. Yet another example of how unfairly talented the late Kurt Vonnegut was. I’m a few pages into Chuck Palahniuk’s new novel, Pygmy. I love his work as well, but this one is proving to be a little bit difficult to get into. We’ll see how it goes.

IFOA: You used to be a track and field star. What do runners and writers have in common?

Card: To begin with, they both have a tremendous amount of tenacity. When pain and frustration levels are high and the prospect of giving up seems outrageously appealing, runners and writers forge ahead and endure what is required to reach the finish line. Secondly, they both have a heaping tablespoon of focusthe ability to tune out the myriad of distractions, and the ability zero in on specific tasks, and seeing those tasks through. In track and field and in writing, in sport and in the arts, I believe these two factors to be as important as any amount of talent.

IFOA: You have written screenplays and now a novel. What’s one thing you prefer about the experience of writing a novel?

Card: Writing a novel is a dream, compared to writing a screenplay. Hands down…for me, anyway. Screenplays are highly formulaic, and certain events must take place at certain page points in your screenplay in order to follow the “tried and true” Hollywood formula of cinematic storytelling. That is all well and good, but I find it claustrophobic in contrast to writing a novel.  With a novel, the bones of good storytelling still apply. However, you have more runway to tell your tale. Simply put, a novel comes without such rigid guidelines, and there is freedom in that. After writing my screenplay, the novel was therapeutic.

IFOA: And one thing you prefer about the experience of writing a screenplay?

Card: A screenplay is a piece of art that undergoes major influence from several key people, at several points along the filmmaking assembly line. The writer gets notes from the producer. Then, the writer gets notes from the director. Then, the writer gets notes from financiers. Then, the writer gets notes from Distributors. THEN, the writer gets notes from the lead actors. So, a screenplay is a very collaborative process, which can be really interesting. That is, unless your vision for the screenplay differs drastically from one of the key people listed above. Then, it is a nightmare. Yes, I did experience a few of those along the way. But that level of collaboration was exciting…minus the nightmare conversations.

Moreover, with a screenplay there is also the magic in the sense that it will become a film. And I love films. My Dad and I have always watched films together and have bonded over several great works of art in the world of film. So, when writing a screenplay, there is something magical about the fact that someone will sit down with their father or mother or sister or brother or significant other or partner or wife or husband… or even their girlfriend or boyfriend du jour. It doesn’t matter. Just the thought of two people (or a large group of people) enjoying something artistic together at the same time is special and it makes the headaches of writing a screenplay entirely motivating.

IFOA: Finish this sentence: It really doesn’t matter if you…

Card: … are successful with your passions, but it does matter if you are proud of your attempts. NOTE: I didn’t used to believe this. When I was running track at a very high level, I couldn’t understand how or why people would train, practice, and work so insanely hard just to come fifth, or tenth, or twentieth, or last. Why bother? My association with hard work and pain was for nothing more than winning.

However, as my track coach Earl Farrell used to say, “life and the sport of track and field are incredibly humbling if you play them long enough.” As my Achilles became wracked with chronic tendonitis before the trials for the Sydney Olympics, and as my hamstring tore years later, I no longer occupied the top spot (or even the podium for that matter). I was no longer a track star or champion. Then, it clicked. My passion, in an instant, became entirely about the friendships, the process, and the ability to put yourself out there and have fun while doing it.

IFOA: Bonus question: This year’s International Festival of Authors in one word…

Card: Booktastic.  (You didn’t say I couldn’t make up a word).

Card will participate in two IFOA events: a round table October 27 and a reading October 28.

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